Lynching victims placed under house arrest

Two men who were nearly lynched by several dozen Arabs have been released from the hospital, but have been placed under house arrest. The chain of events apparently began with a brawl after five Arabs, working in a construction complex in Ra'anana, refused to allow two Jewish locksmiths who also work in the same building to enter the elevator. The brawl turned violent within seconds and within a short time dozens of Arab workers were called to the scene who were not acquaintances of the five attackers, but chose to join the attackers and began beating the Jewish men ferociously. The two called the foreman in charge by phone, "Come quickly, break this up," they told him. The foreman, who did not realize the scope of the incident, arrived at the scene and while looking for the two locksmiths who asked for his help, he identified about forty to fifty Arab workers coming in and out of a nearby tool shed, pulling out shovels, hammers, crow-bars, rods, and other tools. He then found the two Jews who were attempting to shield their heads from the blows raining down on them. A source who received the information about the incident firsthand but wishes to remain anonymous, says that the second the foreman understood what was happening and that there was a clear and present danger to human life, he pulled out his gun and entered the fray. "He pulled out the gun, but didn't point it yet, but as soon as the Arabs saw him they began to leave the place. The two locksmiths remained wounded and bleeding on the ground." The two suffered serious injuries to their heads and backs. An ambulance called to the scene evacuated the two to the hospital, but while they were receiving initial treatment, the Arab attackers made sure to file a complaint with the police accusing the two of attacking them at the elevator Due to this complaint the two were sent to house arrest immediately after the end of their stay at the hospital, and even now, four days after the incident they are under house arrest.

Lynching victims placed under house arrest
Two men who were nearly lynched by several dozen Arabs have been released from the hospital, but have been placed under house arrest. The chain of events apparently began with a brawl after five Arabs, working in a construction complex in Ra'anana, refused to allow two Jewish locksmiths who also work in the same building to enter the elevator. The brawl turned violent within seconds and within a short time dozens of Arab workers were called to the scene who were not acquaintances of the five attackers, but chose to join the attackers and began beating the Jewish men ferociously. The two called the foreman in charge by phone, "Come quickly, break this up," they told him. The foreman, who did not realize the scope of the incident, arrived at the scene and while looking for the two locksmiths who asked for his help, he identified about forty to fifty Arab workers coming in and out of a nearby tool shed, pulling out shovels, hammers, crow-bars, rods, and other tools. He then found the two Jews who were attempting to shield their heads from the blows raining down on them. A source who received the information about the incident firsthand but wishes to remain anonymous, says that the second the foreman understood what was happening and that there was a clear and present danger to human life, he pulled out his gun and entered the fray. "He pulled out the gun, but didn't point it yet, but as soon as the Arabs saw him they began to leave the place. The two locksmiths remained wounded and bleeding on the ground." The two suffered serious injuries to their heads and backs. An ambulance called to the scene evacuated the two to the hospital, but while they were receiving initial treatment, the Arab attackers made sure to file a complaint with the police accusing the two of attacking them at the elevator Due to this complaint the two were sent to house arrest immediately after the end of their stay at the hospital, and even now, four days after the incident they are under house arrest.