[Lowe] Jarrett Allen on his secret: Every time Allen scores, the Cavaliers' game operations staff plays a specific Zelda sound effect.

The release of The Legend of Zelda, with its gold game cartridge, was a landmark event for any child of the 1980s and early 1990s. Allen was born in 1998, but grew up playing subsequent versions of the Zelda series. He collects Zelda-related memorabilia; his favorite such piece, he says, might be his 3D printout of one particular shield. Every time Allen scores, the Cavaliers' game operations staff plays a specific Zelda sound effect -- the jingle that (in the original) played when the protagonist uncovered some secret item or entry point. (Apparently that same sound -- or something very close to it -- has carried over into more recent Zelda iterations.) That sound triggers a little hit of dopamine in my brain. I smile every time. It brings back the excitement of having discovered something new in that game -- once you blew in the cartridge enough times for it to load. Allen first requested the effect with the Nets, when staffers approached players for suggestions. "It took me about 10 seconds to come up with the perfect one," Allen says. "Short and sweet." Article submitted by /u/The_Blind_Bomber[visit reddit] [comments]

[Lowe] Jarrett Allen on his secret: Every time Allen scores,
the Cavaliers' game operations staff plays a specific Zelda sound
effect.
The release of The Legend of Zelda, with its gold game cartridge, was a landmark event for any child of the 1980s and early 1990s. Allen was born in 1998, but grew up playing subsequent versions of the Zelda series. He collects Zelda-related memorabilia; his favorite such piece, he says, might be his 3D printout of one particular shield. Every time Allen scores, the Cavaliers' game operations staff plays a specific Zelda sound effect -- the jingle that (in the original) played when the protagonist uncovered some secret item or entry point. (Apparently that same sound -- or something very close to it -- has carried over into more recent Zelda iterations.) That sound triggers a little hit of dopamine in my brain. I smile every time. It brings back the excitement of having discovered something new in that game -- once you blew in the cartridge enough times for it to load. Allen first requested the effect with the Nets, when staffers approached players for suggestions. "It took me about 10 seconds to come up with the perfect one," Allen says. "Short and sweet." Article submitted by /u/The_Blind_Bomber[visit reddit] [comments]