Daryl Morey Found a Way to Succeed With One Hand Tied Behind His Back

Source: The Ringer During his tenure, the Rockets GM did everything but win a title while dealing with ownership that wouldn’t authorize championship-level spending. Daryl Morey did everything but win an NBA title in 13 seasons as the Rockets GM. Houston came this close in 2018, and made the playoffs 10 times without ever bottoming out during Morey’s tenure, which ended with his resignation on Thursday. Maybe more impressive: that he did this while the Rockets were as frugal as they were successful, going into the luxury tax only once in the past decade. This is really interesting especially because of this: But getting 90 percent of the production for 50 percent of the price ended up backfiring once they got there. The Warriors exposed Houston’s lack of versatility, most famously when the Rockets missed 27 straight 3s in Game 7 of the Western Conference finals in 2018. Morey was criticized for not having a Plan B when his team went cold from the perimeter, but he couldn’t have asked limited offensive players like Ariza and Tucker to take pull-up jumpers, break down defenses off the dribble, or hit cutters out of the high post. Building a team with established veterans who play fundamentally sound basketball on both ends of the floor costs a lot of money. Probably the best example of how hamstrung Morey was, was this: This refusal to spend money became farcical once Alexander sold the team to Tilman Fertitta in 2017. Fertitta spent so much money ($2.2 billion) to purchase the Rockets that he may not have had the liquidity to go into the red to build a title contender. Houston was a laughingstock around the league for the amount of juggling it had to do to stay under the tax. The best example came at the trade deadline last season, when Morey used a future first-round pick to shed the salaries of Brandon Knight and Marquese Chriss. There was no basketball reason for the move. It was just done to cut costs. It’s not that Knight and Chriss would have helped the Rockets. But there were certainly a lot of better things that Morey could have used that pick for. For all the blame Morey's getting for going all in on analytics, critics forget that analytics can only get you so far. You still need to dip into the tax now and again to build a really complete team. Otherwise, you're left at the pauper's table playing budget 2k while your opponents have analytics + money. I think this is even more relevant as more teams nowadays employs analytics to some level, and the advantage analytics used to give against non-analytical teams have disappeared. If both teams are playing analytics, the advantage has to come from somewhere else. submitted by /u/AthKaElGal [visit reddit] [comments]

Daryl Morey Found a Way to Succeed With One Hand Tied Behind
His Back
Source: The Ringer During his tenure, the Rockets GM did everything but win a title while dealing with ownership that wouldn’t authorize championship-level spending. Daryl Morey did everything but win an NBA title in 13 seasons as the Rockets GM. Houston came this close in 2018, and made the playoffs 10 times without ever bottoming out during Morey’s tenure, which ended with his resignation on Thursday. Maybe more impressive: that he did this while the Rockets were as frugal as they were successful, going into the luxury tax only once in the past decade. This is really interesting especially because of this: But getting 90 percent of the production for 50 percent of the price ended up backfiring once they got there. The Warriors exposed Houston’s lack of versatility, most famously when the Rockets missed 27 straight 3s in Game 7 of the Western Conference finals in 2018. Morey was criticized for not having a Plan B when his team went cold from the perimeter, but he couldn’t have asked limited offensive players like Ariza and Tucker to take pull-up jumpers, break down defenses off the dribble, or hit cutters out of the high post. Building a team with established veterans who play fundamentally sound basketball on both ends of the floor costs a lot of money. Probably the best example of how hamstrung Morey was, was this: This refusal to spend money became farcical once Alexander sold the team to Tilman Fertitta in 2017. Fertitta spent so much money ($2.2 billion) to purchase the Rockets that he may not have had the liquidity to go into the red to build a title contender. Houston was a laughingstock around the league for the amount of juggling it had to do to stay under the tax. The best example came at the trade deadline last season, when Morey used a future first-round pick to shed the salaries of Brandon Knight and Marquese Chriss. There was no basketball reason for the move. It was just done to cut costs. It’s not that Knight and Chriss would have helped the Rockets. But there were certainly a lot of better things that Morey could have used that pick for. For all the blame Morey's getting for going all in on analytics, critics forget that analytics can only get you so far. You still need to dip into the tax now and again to build a really complete team. Otherwise, you're left at the pauper's table playing budget 2k while your opponents have analytics + money. I think this is even more relevant as more teams nowadays employs analytics to some level, and the advantage analytics used to give against non-analytical teams have disappeared. If both teams are playing analytics, the advantage has to come from somewhere else. submitted by /u/AthKaElGal [visit reddit] [comments]